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thepoliticalfreakshow:

Remembering African-American Victims Injured By Police Brutality In America

Rev. Earl Baldwin Jr. (Pennsylvania): Tased By Pittsburgh Police While Praying & Giving Last Respects For His Deceased Stepson In A Hospital, Survived The Taser Attack, Has Now Sued Pittsburgh In A Civil Rights Lawsuit Over The Tasing

Reverend Earl Baldwin Jr. of Pittsburgh filed a civil rights lawsuit against police after they allegedly restrained and tased him in a hospital emergency room. Baldwin claims he was trying to pay his last respects to his dead stepson when the incident occurred.

According to Baldwin, he was trying to pray for 23-year-old Mileek Grissom in the UPMC Mercy Hospital, when officers pulled him away and tased him. “I needed to tell him his family was going to be OK,” Baldwin explained to WPXI. “I was going to do everything I could to make sure they were OK.”

Video from a hospital camera shows a distraught Baldwin handcuffed and surrounded by several officers trying to pull him away from his son, and one of the officers shooting him in the back with a taser. Officers say Baldwin was interfering while doctors tried to revive Grissom, but a family attorney says Grissom was dead and not being treated at the time.

The police department has not issued a statement about the lawsuit, but UPMC refutes Baldwin’s claim. “Clearly this was a stressful situation and a tragic loss for this family,” it said. “However, the allegations about the circumstances are inaccurate.”

Tori Baldwin, Grissom’s mother, was denied entry into the hospital at the time.

Source: Carimah Townes for ThinkProgress

(via ajayjay)

carol-on:

Carol and Daryl’s Guide to Flirting

Person A: awkwardly attempt chivalry

Person B: respond with kissy face

(via not-all-cannibals)

(via i-8sumpi)

rexuality:

but how do you convince little kids to wear clever costumes they won’t appreciate?

"mommy can i be batman?"
"no you and your brother are going as van gogh and the starry night painting, it’ll be so hilarious and witty"
"i want to be batman though"
"shhhhh mommy needs more followers on pinterest"

(via i-8sumpi)

m-e-s-t-i-z-a:

housewifeswag:

gayspicy:

im so fucked up over the fact that some countries have free college

and free healthcare 

Kinda like their government acknowledges that those are rights not privileges

(via justtryingtomakeyousmile)

theblacktie:

Well travelled. Well educated. Well dressed.

(via theblacktie)

theblacktie:

A well-tailored suit is to women what lingerie is to men.

(via theblacktie)

theblacktie:

Collar Stays

Simply slide in the collar stay in the pocket on the underside of the dress shirt collar. After that, fold down the collar as normal. Remember that pointed shirt collars require pointed shirt stays. Rounded shirt collars call for rounded collar stays. A proper-fitting collar stay Before you wash your dress shirt (or send the shirt to the dry cleaners), make sure you remove your collar stays. Also remove them before you iron your shirt. Collar stays are easy to lose and can damage your dress shirt if left in by either tearing at the fabric during a wash or leaving a crease under an iron.

I’ve been asked numerous times where I get my collar stays and the best ones I’ve come across are Swiss Stays. You can get them as well by clicking the link below.

http://www.swissstays.com/

(via theblacktie)

theblacktie:

How to Iron Your Shirt in Four Quick Steps
1. Fit your shirt, back side facing up, over the rectangular end of your board (not the pointy end). Moisten the shirt with a water-filled spray bottle if it’s not damp.
2. Finish ironing the back and flip the shirt over to the front. Pull the shirt down so the shoulder seam lies flat on the board and iron out the wrinkles. Repeat on the other shoulder.
3. Take the shirt off the board, flip the collar up, and lay it down so the back of the collar faces up. Spray and iron. Then fold a crease in the collar and iron it in.
4. Lay a sleeve lengthwise on the board and, pulling it taut from the cuff with one hand, iron it with the other. Keep it rotating so you don’t iron a crease into it—your sleeve shouldn’t look 2-D. Then open the cuff and lay it flat so the inside faces up. Iron. Repeat with the other cuff.

theblacktie:

How to Iron Your Shirt in Four Quick Steps

1. Fit your shirt, back side facing up, over the rectangular end of your board (not the pointy end). Moisten the shirt with a water-filled spray bottle if it’s not damp.

2. Finish ironing the back and flip the shirt over to the front. Pull the shirt down so the shoulder seam lies flat on the board and iron out the wrinkles. Repeat on the other shoulder.

3. Take the shirt off the board, flip the collar up, and lay it down so the back of the collar faces up. Spray and iron. Then fold a crease in the collar and iron it in.

4. Lay a sleeve lengthwise on the board and, pulling it taut from the cuff with one hand, iron it with the other. Keep it rotating so you don’t iron a crease into it—your sleeve shouldn’t look 2-D. Then open the cuff and lay it flat so the inside faces up. Iron. Repeat with the other cuff.

(via theblacktie)

theblacktie:

There Are a Zillion Collars. Ignore Them.The spread. The cutaway. The super-duper mega-point. Yeah, we get confused by collar choices, too. But really, you only need to know one: the semispread. It’s not too fashion-forward, not too conservative. It works with every kind of suit, every kind of tie. You can’t go wrong.

theblacktie:

There Are a Zillion Collars. Ignore Them.
The spread. The cutaway. The super-duper mega-point. Yeah, we get confused by collar choices, too. But really, you only need to know one: the semispread. It’s not too fashion-forward, not too conservative. It works with every kind of suit, every kind of tie. You can’t go wrong.

(via theblacktie)

theblacktie:

5 TIPS FOR BUYING THE RIGHT SUIT
Everyone needs a good suit, and if you follow these rules, you’ll be able to find your own
_________________________________________________
Avoid bargains. Know your likes, your dislikes, and what you need it for (work, funerals, court). Squeeze the fabric — if it bounces back with little or no sign of wrinkling, that means it’s good, sturdy material. And tug the buttons gently. If they feel loose or wobbly, that means they’re probably coming off sooner rather than later. The jacket’s shoulder pads are supposed to square with your shoulders; if they droop off or leave dents in the cloth, the jacket’s too big. The jacket sleeves should never meet the wrist any lower than the base of the thumb — if they do, ask to go down a size. Always get fitted.
What to Look for in Suit Cloth:
Nicholas Antongiavanni, author of The Suit: A Machiavellian Approach to Men’s Style, offers a short primer:
Fabric: Suits are made of wool. Mostly. At the upper end, you see wool blended with cashmere. You might even see 100 percent cashmere. For hot weather, linen and cotton and silk are available, but most suits are still made of wool. Stick with that.
Fineness: It’s usually reflected in the so-called “super number.” You know, “super 150’s” and the like. Two things: First, the super number denotes the fineness of the individual fibers. The higher the number, the thinner the fabric and the smoother and silkier the cloth. Second, wool gets rarer the finer it is, so very high supers — 180’s and above — are expensive. But that doesn’t make them better, necessarily. They can be wrinkle-prone, and they show signs of wear — such as shininess — early.
Related: Our Favorite Suits, Blazers and Sport Jackets for Men
Strength: Take a bunch of the cloth and squeeze it. Does it bounce back to life quickly, with little to no visible wrinkling? Does it feel like there’s something to it, some structure — what tailors call “guts”? That’s a good sign. It’s nearly ineffable, but play around with cloth long enough and you’ll come to know it.
Variety: What you will see on most store racks is plain weave or worsted (the smooth, tightly woven stuff) — basic business cloth. But there’s more to cloth than worsted. The most common alternatives are flannel (spongy, fuzzy stuff) and tweed. Flannel is a classic cool-weather cloth. And we all know what tweed is.

theblacktie:

5 TIPS FOR BUYING THE RIGHT SUIT

Everyone needs a good suit, and if you follow these rules, you’ll be able to find your own

_________________________________________________

Avoid bargains. Know your likes, your dislikes, and what you need it for (work, funerals, court). Squeeze the fabric — if it bounces back with little or no sign of wrinkling, that means it’s good, sturdy material. And tug the buttons gently. If they feel loose or wobbly, that means they’re probably coming off sooner rather than later. The jacket’s shoulder pads are supposed to square with your shoulders; if they droop off or leave dents in the cloth, the jacket’s too big. The jacket sleeves should never meet the wrist any lower than the base of the thumb — if they do, ask to go down a size. Always get fitted.

What to Look for in Suit Cloth:

Nicholas Antongiavanni, author of The Suit: A Machiavellian Approach to Men’s Style, offers a short primer:

Fabric: Suits are made of wool. Mostly. At the upper end, you see wool blended with cashmere. You might even see 100 percent cashmere. For hot weather, linen and cotton and silk are available, but most suits are still made of wool. Stick with that.

Fineness: It’s usually reflected in the so-called “super number.” You know, “super 150’s” and the like. Two things: First, the super number denotes the fineness of the individual fibers. The higher the number, the thinner the fabric and the smoother and silkier the cloth. Second, wool gets rarer the finer it is, so very high supers — 180’s and above — are expensive. But that doesn’t make them better, necessarily. They can be wrinkle-prone, and they show signs of wear — such as shininess — early.

Related: Our Favorite Suits, Blazers and Sport Jackets for Men

Strength: Take a bunch of the cloth and squeeze it. Does it bounce back to life quickly, with little to no visible wrinkling? Does it feel like there’s something to it, some structure — what tailors call “guts”? That’s a good sign. It’s nearly ineffable, but play around with cloth long enough and you’ll come to know it.

Variety: What you will see on most store racks is plain weave or worsted (the smooth, tightly woven stuff) — basic business cloth. But there’s more to cloth than worsted. The most common alternatives are flannel (spongy, fuzzy stuff) and tweed. Flannel is a classic cool-weather cloth. And we all know what tweed is.

(via theblacktie)